H2O'Lyon Webinar #9 // Damien Alliau

On The November 18, 2021

5 pm (Paris time)
French and English speaking

The contribution of physical modelling to the design of sand transport correction structures: the case of the rebalancing programme for the Loire river bed at Nantes.

Speaker :
Damien Alliau, Hydraulic and Solid Transport Project Manager, Compagnie Nationale du Rhône (CNR)
 

► The contribution of physical modelling to the design of sand transport correction structures: the case of the rebalancing programme for the Loire river bed at Nantes.


"Channelization of the river through the creation of navigation groins, dredging, etc., all of which were once carried out between Les Ponts-de-Cé and Nantes, have disrupted the balance of the Loire. The river bed has become deeper, the water level at low water has fallen, leading to the drying out of the riverbanks, an impoverishment of the natural environment, a rise in salinity, etc.
In order to preserve the balance of the Loire, its biodiversity, the quality of the water and the activities linked to the river, it is necessary to act. This is the purpose of the programme to rebalance the bed of the Loire. The project is estimated to cost 42 million euros (2015 value) and is funded by the Loire Bretagne Water Agency (45%), the Pays-de-la-Loire Region (30%), the European Regional Development Fund for the Loire Basin - ERDF Loire (20%) and Voies Navigables de France (5%).
In this webinar, the design method for a sediment correction structure in the vicinity of Nantes will be addressed, illustrated and discussed, namely through studies on large-scale physical models in the laboratory."

Damien Alliau is a hydraulic engineer (fluid mechanics) at the Compagnie Nationale du Rhône (CNR) since 2011. He participates in projects within the company (hydroelectric developments, biological or sedimentary recovery works) or on behalf of third parties (institutions, consultancies) as a project manager and expert in numerical and physical modelling. He is currently working in the physical modelling laboratory in Lyon.